Deep Dialogue

Welcome to the Deep Dialogue page, where Participants in the Conversation share their views on the importance and nature of interfaith dialogue and related issues, and also post news items. Deep Dialogue recognizes that we can do more together, and do so better, when we provide opportunity to talk about the things that have deepest meaning for us. We believe that our desires to contribute to the well-being of all people come from the place where our values and beliefs reside, not from a superficial desire to get along with others. When we are able to share those things that hold deep meaning for us, we not only promote better understanding but we are also able to better anticipate where and how we can work better together.

Guest blog posts are welcome (send requests to info@interfaithconversation.ca). Please note that views expressed in blog posts written by a Conversation Participant reflect their own views, not those of the Canadian Interfaith Conversation as a whole.

Plans are underway for the fifth iteration of the Our Whole Society Conference to be held May 3-4, 2021, at The Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg.

"Our Whole Society: Free to Believe, Responsible to Act" will seek to "draw on insights from diverse religious and secular traditions of thought to find common ground that helps us to build a society that is more unified amidst its diversity." The impact of the coronavirus pandemic will be addressed as will be Canada's mixed legacy of promoting religious freedom. 

This event is being postponed to a later date, still to be determined.

The Canadian Interfaith Conversation will host a gathering focused on children’s rights in relation to spiritual development on April 1, from 1:00 to 3:00 PM, at the University of Toronto Multi-Faith Centre, 569 Spadina Avenue.

Participants will be invited into dialogue on the role of faith leaders and faith communities in supporting young people to realize their rights, including their right to spiritual development. Questions to be addressed include:

The Canadian Interfaith Conversation was established to promote harmony and religious insight among religions and religious communities in Canada, strengthen our society’s moral foundations, and work for greater realization of the fundamental freedom of conscience and religion for the sake of the common good and an engaged citizenship. The reports of antisemitic carnivals held in Aalst, Belgium are deeply troubling, and they stand in opposition to the core principles of the Canadian Interfaith Conversation and its desire for constructive expressions of religious and cultural pluralism.

In 2005, the UN General Assembly designated January 27 as International Holocaust Remembrance Day, marking the anniversary of the 1945 liberation of Auschwitz-Birkenau, the Nazis’ largest death camp where one million Jews perished.

This year’s International Holocaust Remembrance Day ceremonies were particularly poignant as Jews and non-Jews around the world came together to mark 75 years since the liberation, joined by a now-dwindling number of Survivors of Auschwitz and other Nazi death camps. 

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