Deep Dialogue

Welcome to the Deep Dialogue page, where Participants in the Conversation share their views on the importance and nature of interfaith dialogue and related issues, and also post news items. Deep Dialogue recognizes that we can do more together, and do so better, when we provide opportunity to talk about the things that have deepest meaning for us. We believe that our desires to contribute to the well-being of all people come from the place where our values and beliefs reside, not from a superficial desire to get along with others. When we are able to share those things that hold deep meaning for us, we not only promote better understanding but we are also able to better anticipate where and how we can work better together.

Guest blog posts are welcome (send requests to info@interfaithconversation.ca). Please note that views expressed in blog posts written by a Conversation Participant reflect their own views, not those of the Canadian Interfaith Conversation as a whole.

In the late spring of 2015, a young Yazidi woman named Nafiya Naso came to give a talk at the Asper Jewish Community Centre in Winnipeg.  She told of a horrific genocide of Yazidis that was taking place in Iraq.  Some of those who heard her talk were moved to action. 

The Parliament of the World’s Religions is coming to Toronto in the fall of 2018. 

Established in 1893, this Parliament is the largest interfaith gathering in the world. It was formed to create harmony among the world’s religious and spiritual communities, with the goal of building a more peaceful, just and sustainable world. 

Rebecca Starkman, a senior PhD student in Education at OISE/University of Toronto, is studying how religious girls navigate their academic and social lives in public school. Rebecca herself is a Jewish woman, and is very interested in how girls of all religions experience the secular and public space of high school in the GTA.

On February 23, 2017, young people aged 18-35 years old joined members of the Canadian Interfaith Conversation at the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs (CIJA) offices in Toronto for a meal and time of discussion.  Older members of the Conversation had invited younger people to join the gathering that evening to share their thoughts about how interfaith work related to their generation.

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