Advocating for religion in a pluralistic society and in Canadian public life

The Conversation and Several of its Participants Respond to the Truth & Reconciliation Commission's Call to Action #48

In June 2015 the Truth & Reconciliation Commission, established to investigate the traumatic impact of residential schools on Indigenous communities, addressed several "Calls to Action" to all faith communities in Canada. #48 asked the communities to indicate by March 31, 2016 how they planned to "adopt and comply with the principles, norms and standards of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as a framework for reconciliation."

The Canadian Interfaith Conversation developed a Statement on the Importance of Truth and Reconciliation and the Rights of Indigenous PeoplesAn Ecumenical Statement on the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was issued by several Participants in the Conversation, including Anglican Church of Canada, Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, The Presbyterian Church in Canada, The Salvation Army and The United Church of Canada.

Individual church statements were also released by:

·       Anglican Church of Canada – Let Our "Yes" be Yes

·       Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops – Catholic Response to Call to Action #48

·       Canadian Council of Churches - Acknowledgment of the March 31st deadline for response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Call to Action #48

·       Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada - ELCIC Statement on Implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples 

·       The Evangelical Fellowship of Canada – Statement in Response to Call to Action #48 of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

·       The Salvation Army - The Salvation Army Response to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

        The United Church of Canada - Statement on UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as the Framework for Reconciliation