Deep Dialogue

Welcome to the Deep Dialogue page, where Participants in the Conversation share their views on the importance and nature of interfaith dialogue and related issues, and also post news items. Deep Dialogue recognizes that we can do more together, and do so better, when we provide opportunity to talk about the things that have deepest meaning for us. We believe that our desires to contribute to the well-being of all people come from the place where our values and beliefs reside, not from a superficial desire to get along with others. When we are able to share those things that hold deep meaning for us, we not only promote better understanding but we are also able to better anticipate where and how we can work better together.

Guest blog posts are welcome (send requests to info@interfaithconversation.ca). Please note that views expressed in blog posts written by a Conversation Participant reflect their own views, not those of the Canadian Interfaith Conversation as a whole.

In an article he wrote in September 2016, Geoffrey Cameron, chair of the Program Committee for the Building Our Whole Society Conference, demonstrates what interfaith conversation can look like.

Have you ever heard of a Living Library?  It works just like a regular library, in that visitors browse a catalogue to find titles, choose a book, borrow it and then return it when they have finished reading it.  The only difference is that in a Living Library, Books are people. You “read” this kind of Book by having a conversation with someone.

The following is a response to two articles; one from columnist Taslim Jaffer who wrote an article entitled Building Bridges: Tolerance is Beneath Us and the second, a letter to the editor of Peace Arch News titled Christians More than Accepting by Surrey resident Patricia Kroeker, both of which can be read here)
 

Participants in the Canadian Interfaith Conversation mourn the recent attacks on our sisters and brothers of faith and their Ottawa houses of worship. We strongly condemn the offensive graffiti as hurtful, criminal and counter to Canadian values of inclusivity and acceptance.

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